Paying For Home Nursing Care / Long-Term Care Insurance

What is Long-Term Care Insurance? 

Simply put, it’s an insurance product that helps pay for the costs of long-term care. This type of insurance covers additional medical care and support services that most health insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid won’t cover. 

Long-term insurance covers care in a nursing home, assisted living facility, or another facility, and in-home nursing care, such as home health aides and companion care. 

The benefits are many. And, if your primary care doctor recommends that home-based care is necessary, then you don’t have to pay out-of-pocket.

What is Medicare?

Medicare long-term care insurance is not a perfect solution, and you must meet certain requirements to qualify. 

Medicare is a national health insurance program run by the federal government. Medicare covers people aged sixty-five and older.

  • Some people under age 65 may also qualify due to a disability
  • Medicare helps millions of American seniors cover some of their healthcare costs. There are four distinct parts to Medicare.

Part A – Inpatient hospital care

Part B – Doctors’ visits

Part C – Also called Medicare Advantage plan is another choice that combines parts A & B. These Medicare plans may include dental, vision and hearing, however, you should research the options and be sure you understand the coverage and out-of-pocket costs.

Part D – Prescription drugs

Additionally, you should familiarize yourself with Medigap or Medicare supplemental plans. You can find information on these options through AARP or Humana.

Medicare supplemental plans help give people more health-care choices, so they can pick the health care plan that best meets their needs.

Medicaid 

Medicaid benefits are intended for lower-income people and the program is structured as a federal-state partnership. This means the Federal Governments sets the core requirements on eligibility and benefits, and states are entitled to matching funds from the federal Medicaid program. Each state has some flexibility to administer the benefits within the federal guidelines. Entitlement to Medicaid programs may vary depending on the state where you live. You can learn more about Medicaid at Medicaid.gov 

It is important to know your options before enrolling in a long-term care plan. If you don’t have a lot of money, Medicaid may not be the best option. A professional such as Mazaltov Home Care Services can help you choose the best option.

Private long-term care insurance may provide additional financial assistance in times of crisis. Most plans pay out up to $150,000 for each person. By purchasing long-term care insurance, you can protect your assets and keep more money in your pocket. And if you don’t need a nursing home, Medicaid will pay the difference.

Long-term care services and supports

Millions of Americans require long-term care services and supports. Many suffer from disabilities, chronic illnesses, and other health issues that make daily tasks difficult or impossible. Medicaid covers certain services that can be costly to access without insurance. Fortunately, Medicaid also covers services that can be provided in a home or community-based setting. For Medicaid participants, the costs of personal care assistance can be as low as $1,200 per month.

Medicare covers skilled nursing care, rehabilitation, and regular home care for up to 21 days. Unlike traditional health insurance, however, Medicare does not cover assistance with daily living activities, such as getting dressed or eating. Some policies also pay for the cost of durable medical equipment that is necessary for a person to continue living independently. In some cases, Medicaid covers only a part of the costs, making long-term care insurance a better option for many people.

The term “long-term services and supports” refers to a broad range of health and personal care services. They can range from basic housekeeping to complex care, from transportation to help with paying bills. In the past, most Americans received LTSS in an institutional setting such as a nursing home or intermediate care facility. However, access to HCBS (home and community-based services) often have a long waiting list. Most of the time, elderly people in need of medical assistance and support service would prefer to remain in the comfort of their own homes. Mazaltov Nurse Registry can provide a wealth information and resources to help you decide on the best and most affordable insurance and care solutions.

Understanding 3 Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease

While every patient is different, when a person is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease, they usually have experienced minor memory loss or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) during the early stage. This disease often goes undiagnosed, and in some cases misdiagnosed, for years before the symptoms become evident.

Some stages overlap. The changes in the brain that occur during the preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s Disease may be present but undetected for years or even decades before any noticeable symptoms occur. Often, by the time these changes appear, and the impairment becomes noticeable, the disease has progressed to the middle stage. Many times, the initial stages are either ignored or mistaken for depression or another illness.

Memory Loss

While the hippocampus is the part of the brain responsible for forming new memories and learning new information, it is often damaged in Alzheimer’s. This means that people with Alzheimer’s disease have a hard time remembering recent events and often repeat conversations. While hippocampus activity is important for recent or present memory retrieval, it is less important for long-term memories. Therefore, in the initial stages of the disease, a person may remember a past event perfectly despite having a damaged hippocampus.

The first indicator of Alzheimer’s disease is often semantic memory. A patient with the disease has a progressive decline in general knowledge that they once could recall easily. For instance, questions about celebrities and well-known logos are more difficult for them to answer. In later stages, they may also have difficulty identifying objects and animals. Some people with the disease can no longer identify familiar objects, but they may remember how they felt about an important event or relationship. Even if they don’t remember specific details, they may recognize certain objects or recall emotions from seeing a drawing or photograph.

Dementia

Dementia in Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive disorder in which a person loses cognitive abilities. Researchers studied this condition and the effect of executive function on the severity of dementia. Some studies even show that age can influence cognitive function. However, the current state of our knowledge of dementia is still limited.

The Stroop task and the Stroop color-word tests have been considered the gold standard for assessing impairment specifically in the prefrontal cortices of the brain. Researchers have used the Stroop method to determine the effect of both age and dementia on brain performance since the 1930s. Other studies have examined the role of negative priming, where subjects with Alzheimer’s tend to have more difficulty with the tasks. Studies on the effect of aging and dementia and memory performance have revealed that different types of dementia affect different components of memory and attention. For example, age-related differences in inhibitory functioning are found in the Stroop tests, meaning healthy elderly participants were more likely to take their time to comprehend the questions and answer correctly. Older people with mild Alzheimer’s disease suffer worse performance in the task.

Nursing Care Resources

For people who are caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease, there are many nursing care resources for Alzheimer’s. Many of these resources will help the caregiver better understand the disease, teach them how to manage the disease, and provide additional support. In addition to providing information on specific conditions, they will provide practical information for long-term care communities. Take the time to learn about your local community resources and be well informed before you decide on a care facility or home nursing provider.

Medicaid is a state-funded program for the elderly and low-income families. Individuals with Alzheimer’s may qualify for Medicaid benefits, which will cover the cost of nursing home care. Each state administers Medicaid programs separately, and the benefits of caring for an individual with dementia may vary. This information can help you find out if Medicaid will cover the care your loved one needs.

Home Care Services: Emergency Planning Tips for Senior Citizens


Home Care Services:
Are you caring for your elderly loved one?

Maybe, it is your grandparent, elderly aunt, or elderly parent. No matter who you are caring for, it is important to help them with emergency planning. There are many senior citizens who don’t have a plan for what will happen if they fall, if there is a house fire, or if they experience another type of emergency. Sometimes, they just don’t think about these things, and other times, they are unsure of how to make a plan. You can help your elderly loved one plan for various emergency situations. Then, you or a home care services provider can help your elderly loved one to prepare or practice what to do in these situations.


Creating the Emergency Plans


One of the things that you are going to want to do first is to assist your elderly loved one in creating emergency plans. There are different emergencies that they could face such as a house fire, falling in their bathroom, or getting locked out of their house in the winter. It is very important that your elderly loved one has a plan for these different kinds of emergencies.

It is impossible to plan for every emergency that could possibly happen. However, making sure that your elderly loved one has some plans in place could help them significantly in the case of an emergency.

If your elderly loved one has 24-hour home care providers, make sure they are privy to these emergency plans, as well. That way everyone is on the same page about what to do if your elderly loved one is faced with an emergency.


Getting an Emergency Supply Kit


There are various companies that sell emergency supply kits. However, you or senior care providers could also help your elderly loved one to make their own kit. Some things that they should have in the emergency supply kit include:

  • Candles
  • Generator
  • Bandaids
  • Gauze
  • Antiseptic and antibiotic creams
  • List of phone numbers
  • Emergency pager/emergency button


You can sit down with your elderly loved ones to ensure they know where everything is. It is best to put the kit where your elderly loved one won’t forget about it.


Reaching Out to the Community


Fortunately, most communities have various resources to help senior citizens and others in the case of an emergency. For example, if your elderly loved one does have a house fire, their community may have resources that offer free clothing, food, or other necessities. You should help your elderly loved one look into these resources ahead of time, in case they are needed.


Homecare: Conclusion


These are some of the things you and your elderly loved one may want to know about emergency planning for them. If they need additional resources, have them reach out to community organizations, the local police station, or their home care services providers.

If you or an aging loved one are considering hiring Home Care Services in Palm Beach, FL, or the surrounding areas, please give us a call at (561) 465-5920

Sources
https://www.cdc.gov/features/older-adult-emergency/index.html
https://www.redcross.org/content/